updated imovie

The Facebook page for Porirua hosted several discussions about memories of Porirua and local MP Kris Faafoi (bless him) offered to record former resident Joe Ryland.

This gave me an opportunity to test drive my new mac and the updated version of imovie.

It took me a while to get going and I still cannot find the best way to find and import images from what once was iphoto.  Iphoto has gone, replaced by a less than intuitive images folder. One day I’ll sort this out.

Apart from that editing this video was easy, but I was grateful that I had used Camtasia at work, just to get my head round imovie. It seems like an amalgam of Camtasia and I suspect the pro version of imovie/Final Cut.

So here is the latest story/memory. Thanks to both Joe and Kris for doing this.

 

 

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digi stories

I’ve been exploring using comics to tell stories using bitstrips: https://www.bitstrips.com/create/comic/
Here’s a kind of movie we made for work using bitstrips and imovie.

diiarts

This looks an interesting and useful site which I intend to explore more.

http://www.digitalartsonline.co.uk/tutorials/after-effects/create-an-indie-style-animation/#6

Does anyone have any great animated comic sites that are fee or open source? My imac is getting elderly and won’t support dmg that are older than 10.9 alas.

 

More to follow on this I think.

another about amy

There are of course many reviews of the Amy story and movie. This is one by Ty Bur and the Boston Globe.

amy

My point amongst all the reviews that talk of her pain is the way the film is presented. It follows almost some of the digital story values where the story and the telling take precedence over who is telling the story. I don’t mean that the teller is lost but I do mean that the focus becomes placed on the story.

I’m not sure throughout the story that I had a real understanding of who her manager “Nick” was but the story he told was resounding. But he does talk to us in the Kathryn Bronwich Observer interview. Amy’s best friend (is this she of “we’re best friends right?”) talks over images and videos but we never really see her. It’s a powerful way to tell a story.

one more story

This story – a conversation with Taku Parai – was a long time in coming. I’d been asking Taku to tell us about the suburb in which I live for some time and I finally got him to sit down and talk with me. The ending stops suddenly because his phone rang – he’s a busy man.

Because he really just talks it took a long time to edit, as do many of these local histories. But they are worth the effort for their value.

I spent quite a while looking online for images and was grateful for the Alexander Turnbull Library’s collection and their willingness to share. The local museum, Pataka also has a wealth of images and so it became difficult to decide which to use. When I failed to find appropriate old images I went out and about and took some of my own. On some I used the black and white option to make them fit with the other images a little more, but the piece where he talks about the long summer months seemed appropriate for colour and the shot of the Takapu Valley is so beautiful it deserved the same colour retention.

I was also aided by input from friends who looked closely at the story and made useful suggestions – for example contextualising the story with my own voice.

I’m hoping this works. I think it does.

Crossposting tricksters

trickstersWhile I don’t wish to cross contaminate blogs it occurred to me that some readers of this blog may be interested in the story from the edtech.ako blog about Alan Levine who recently visited New Zealand and brought with him some ideas.

http://edtechako.wordpress.com/2014/11/14/tricksters/

When I get sorted I’ll sort how to perfect my partial retweeting skills.